Company History

AGT’s founder and CEO, Dr. Eugenia Wang, founded the company in December, 2005 as part of her commitment to move bench discoveries to bedside application and eventually to market commercialization. Since April, 2010, Dr. Wang has been leading the research and development of AGT on entrepreneurial leave arranged with the University of Louisville, allowing her to devote 51% of her time and effort to the company, while still holding the Gheens Endowed Chair in Aging at the University of Louisville with the other 49%. Through this effort, AGT has quickly expanded to 10 employees, with two small business innovation research (SBIR) grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Kentucky State Technology Corporation, a non-profit organization of the State of Kentucky. Among all the long-term career discoveries of Dr. Wang, blood-based diagnostics emerge as the most promising area of commercial development for two diseases of the elderly,  Alzheimer’s disease and ovarian carcinoma.

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Mission Statement

Advanced Genomic Technology, LLC (AGT) is a biotechnology company based in Louisville, Kentucky, founded in December 2005. AGT’s mission is to develop and market a non-invasive, blood-based test for diagnosis and prognosis of: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) victims and at-risk groups, including individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and elderly > 65 years of age;

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The Products

AGT is developing screening tests are microRNA-based blood tests.  AGT has identified certain key cir­cu­la­t­ing microRNAs as biomarkers for AD staging, differentiating individuals currently suffer­ing AD into three different stages: mild, moderate and severe, disting­uished from MCI victims and the ADAR group. Separation of these stages by cognitive tests such as mini-mental status

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The Market

The potential market base AD screening tests is worldwide, driven not only by AD pat­ients, but also by the tens of millions of aging baby boomers who are quickly approaching the cri­tical age of 65 years, and those in their 50s who are at high risk for AD. AD patients number some 5.3 million in the US alone, incurring >$180 billion per year in direct health care costs (or ~$200 bil­lion when unpaid caregivers'

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